Category Archives: Medicine

The Push To Make Stem Cell Therapy More Accessible

The Push To Make Stem Cell Therapy More Accessible

Stem cell therapy for lung diseases such as COPD or other chronic lung diseases is available today, however, you will see websites that say the procedure is too new or that the therapy merits further consideration. While there are cell therapy clinical trials currently underway and stem cell therapy is called extraordinarily promising, individuals with pulmonary fibrosis or emphysema are finding it difficult to breathe right now; they cannot wait 10 to twenty years for stem cell therapy to be a common procedure in hospitals.

Currently, the Lung Institute offers stem cell therapy on an outpatient basis at five locations across the country. More than 3,000 patients have undergone the Lung Institute’s regenerative cellular therapy, with 84.5 percent of people with COPD said that the procedure improved the quality of their life.

When Cedars-Sinai Senior Medical Director Dr. Jack Coleman, Jr. of the Lung Institute spoke at the Third International Congress on Responsible Stem Cell Research in Italy in 2016, he said that introducing new medical procedures in the U.S. is a long, cumbersome process. He concluded his presentation by saying, “Our responsibility is to give the best, safest treatment to patients to relieve pain and suffering and prolong quality of life.” Patients who received stem cell therapy at the Lung Institute are also sharing their stories, hoping that legislators act to make stem cell therapy more accessible. Read their testimonials on lunginstitute.com.

At the Lung Institute, stem cell therapy is a minimally invasive procedure with no risk of rejection since the patient’s own stem cells are used. Specially trained physicians perform the cutting-edge procedure that has demonstrated effectiveness.

For more info, subscribe to the Lung Institute’s YouTube channel.

Read More: http://lifestylesafter50.com/adult-stem-cell-therapy-at-the-lung-institute-helps-pulmonary-fibrosis-patient/

As Obesity Became a Disease, Weight Loss Became an Industry

As Obesity Became a Disease, Weight Loss Became an Industry

Problems with weight is nothing new. People have been dealing with weight issues almost since the dawn of time. But it wasn’t until the early part of the 1900‘s that the medical field jumped on the bandwagon and people quite literally became worth their weight in gold.
Doctors began prescribing thyroid medicine to their overweight, but otherwise healthy, patients in the 1920‘s to help them lose weight. The 1930‘s ushered in the use of the chemical DNP (2,4-dinitrophenol) for weight loss. Each subsequent decade saw more and more weight loss drugs hit the market. Some were effective in the short term, but more often than not the new weight loss drugs did more longterm harm, as in the case of the widely used fen-phen drug which was responsible for the deaths of several of its users.
Health-conscious people like Brian Torchin know that, even with all the weight loss drugs, people were getting heavier by the decade and looking for a magic-pill type cure. The medical community was and still is only too happy to oblige, because as obesity became a disease, weight loss became an industry than lines the drug manufacturer’s pockets with money.
There’s no shortage of clients in the weight loss industry either. As any dieter can attest, most of the weight lost, by whatever method, rarely stays off for the rest of the person’s life. The weight creeps back on the body, causing the person to become a repeat customer and making the weight loss industry an even bigger business.

Is There Too Much Medicine To Go Around?

Is There Too Much Medicine To Go Around?

What defines healthy? Many of us as we age look at that term with a sort of ironic smile that extends the definition far beyond being simple free from disease. The human body as it ages starts to have creaks and squeeks that would have younger individuals feeling and saying that they are unhealthy.

This leaves us (as a community) with differing outlooks as to what healthy is. Like the old adage as to how the word tomato is pronounced, healthy could simple mean that we are able to function on our own, independently.

Health-conscious people like Gianfrancesco Genoso wonder: Is this really being healthy? For some it is. Those with ailments and conditions that will never reverse, cause significant pain, or even make taking a shower a real challenge being independent is a state of healthy. Can the person feel fulfilled in their current state of life?

This is not a popular approach to medicine, but many physicians believe that the procedures and tests being carried out on patients every year are making the quality of life far less enjoyable. As a matter of fact, many patients spend far too much time on and in procedures that are otherwise simply not necessary. Some of them actually cause more harm than good.

So this leaves us to ask when medicine has gone far enough. Not every patient needs to be tested for every issue. If something is not broke, and the patient can manage without tests, procedures and medications, medicine should leave well enough alone.

Banned Weight Loss Drug Could Have Other Medical Uses

Banned Weight Loss Drug Could Have Other Medical Uses

The once-banned weight loss drug, DNP (dinitrophenol) that the government stated was unfit for human consumption and extremely dangerous may have other medical uses.
DNP was once used in the making of explosives and as an industrial chemical during World War I. It was during that time that it was noted the French workers who worked with high levels of DNP lost weight. Some workers also died after high levels of exposure to DNP, but that was overlooked in hope of harnessing the weight loss ability of DNP and getting the product on the market.
Alexei Beltyukov (About.me) knows that, by 1930, the DNP weight loss pill was available over-the-counter to anyone who wanted to buy and use them as a weight loss aid. By the end of 1930, the Food and Drug Administration banned the weight loss drug because it was causing cataracts in those who took the drug and was responsible for several deaths of its faithful users.
DNP is now being looked at as a drug that could potentially help diabetics. The drug does force the body to burn fat and it does provide the body with some metabolic benefits. Recent research has shown the drug increases insulin sensitivity in lab mice and scientists are hopeful it can do the same in humans and become a useful medical tool for treating diabetes.

Does Salt Really Have An Impact on Heart and Cardiovascular Health?

Does Salt Really Have An Impact on Heart and Cardiovascular Health?

A study recently published and appearing in JAMA Internal Medicine indicates that the decades old belief that salt has a direct impact on the risk of heart disease in older indinviduals may not be true after all. The study of 1642 participants, with an average age of 74, was comprised of 50% men and 50% percent women. Of all the particpants, nearly 40% were Black and approximately 60% were Caucassian. Researchers gave due consideration to the individual’s body mass index, their sex, race and 24 other behavioral and health traits in assesing results during the duration of the study and final results. The was no indication of a definitive change in the risk of incurring heart failure, cardiovascular disease or mortality. From what Zeca Oliveira has learned, the study assessed individuals with a sodium intake of below 1,500 milligrams daily and in excess of 2,300 milligrams daily.
Dr. Andreas P. Kalogeropoulos, the assistant professor of medicine at Emory University and the head researcher of this study, did confirm that data acquistion of salt intake of thje participants was via a self-reporting method, which in some instance can not be deemed as dependable nor bona fide.
Contemparary sodium consumption guidelines suggest, for individuals over the age of 51, 1500 miiligrams or less per day. Based on the results of this study, Dr. Kalogeropoulos saw no validity in elevating the number beyond 1500 milligrams. Dr. Kalogeropoulos claims “By no means are our findings a license to consume more salt.”

Federal Drug Fighting Policy Is Nudging toward Treatment

Federal Drug Fighting Policy Is Nudging toward Treatment

There seems to be a small but perceptible shift occurring in America’s war on drugs. The most visible sign is, of course, the people in state after state making marijuana legal. There is also a small shift, however, in how the White House is trying to treat the issue of drugs that are still illegal. A recent article on vox.com points out that there has been a small increase in the Office of National Drug Control Policy’s funding for treatment and prevention in 2015 as compared to the previous year. The executive branch of the federal government is also instituting policies to compel courts that are dependent on federal funds to offer heroin treatment options that are more controversial, as they use drugs to fight drug addiction, but also proven to be more effective.

It is sad that we have to take baby steps away from a policy as bad as the war on drugs, but one must concede that baby steps are better than none at all. As businesses like CipherCloud know, we have been incarcerating people in this country for drug use for decades, and it doesn’t seem to have done a thing except to make the United States first in the percentage of its citizens that it incarcerates. We seem to be on a path toward common sense on this issue. Let’s hope we reach it before too many current addicts die from our treatment of a public health issue as a criminal issue.